Is Bivocational Ministry a Sin?

bivo ministryToday, I am going to give you a “behind the scenes” look at the life and thought process of a bivocational pastor. This category of minister is becoming more common, because we are seeing a fundamental change in the landscape of pastoral ministry. The economy is changing in a way so that many churches are not able to pay their pastor a full-time wage so they must seek employment outside of the church to support their family. It is nothing new, of course, because we know that missionaries have been doing this very thing for hundreds of years. Traditionally, we see this type of ministry done in a church with a smaller membership. The reason for this is obvious; a lack of funding. I am a bivocational pastor, and I know many of them. I don’t often hear complaints about living this lifestyle from the clergy themselves. It is necessary and most are happy to do it (albeit tired) if it means being able to give more to the church, and support their family.

Bivocational ministry can be a great blessing to the Kingdom of God. Through this method, pastors can directly interact with people in the workplace that they may not normally get to minister to. Clergy then can be immersed missionaries in all environments, and embed themselves in just about any context. These are positive aspects to this lifestyle.

Are there any negatives to living this way? Well…unfortunately there are downfalls. Pastors get tired, and as much as we can say that they need to be solely sustained by their calling, it does not negate the fact that our physical bodies and emotional capacities wear down over time. Members will sometimes become frustrated with their leader because the church may not be growing by a massive amount. Meanwhile, the minister is giving every ounce of energy they possess to two (or more) vocations and it can feel like running on a never-ending treadmill. While the pastor is at their day job, there may even be a person who needs them laying in a hospital bed, and their family is becoming frustrated because they have not yet had a visit. Often the answer is to demand more and more from the leader instead of stepping up to the plate.

Clergy that choose to live this life accept the fact that they must adapt to the needs of their position. Sometimes they drop the ball, or forget an important detail. There are times they want to say “no” because they just want one free night to themselves. At the same time, love and the desire for the broken to be healed compels them. It animates their dry bones. Changed lives ignite energy.

I have spoken with pastors who become very frustrated, because people have told them that they need to be more focused on the church and that they should quit their job and “trust God more” for finances. I would argue that this pastor should ask that wonderful parishioner to quit their job so they can volunteer at the church full-time, and see what they say. I digress. The fact is, there are many Christians who would never admit it, but by their actions, would consider bivocational ministry a sin. “Sin” of course being that which inconveniences them. What we forget is that every Christian is called to be a minister. Every believer is a missionary in their context.

Now, before I get angry emails and comments, I want to make it very clear, that I am very blessed to have a congregation that understands the costs and rewards of a pastor that is bivocational. I appreciate the fact that I can live this life with their support and encouragement.

Scripture tells us that even the Apostle Paul was a minister who worked a second job. He had an incredible passion for the Gospel. He did what God called Him to do. He looked forward and didn’t dwell in the past.

Is bivocational ministry a sin? Of course not. Let’s stop treating it that way.

Love you all.

-Landon DeCrastos

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3 Things All Pastors Should Know

3 Things All Pastors Should KnowOne of the most important lessons I have learned as a pastor is that I must always maintain a teachable spirit. Ministry can be stressful and require a lot of physical, spiritual, emotional, and mental energy so making a vow to humbly learn all one can is vital. I am, by no means, an expert in the area of ministry, but I have realized that there are things I didn’t necessarily learn in seminary.  I do believe that my schooling was very valuable and I would recommend it to any pastor I speak with, but there are just so many things that must be learned on the “field” that can’t be taught.

Today, I want to speak about 3 Things All Pastors Should Know.

Sometimes your ideas are not the best ideas– Often when a pastor enters into their ministry calling, they have big and beautiful ideas about the programs, sermons, partnerships, and impact they will have in their church or organization. These types of thoughts get them excited about the endless possibilities. Then, reality sets in and when the minister makes their attempt to change the world, discouragement comes because the people they are leading are not responding in the way they imagined. Sometimes, this makes church leaders frustrated and want to give up. The fact is, this realization does have to be a bad thing. Often times, the best thing that could happen in pastoral ministry is for the anointed leader to come to terms with the fact that they are not the most creative person in the church. Perhaps there are others that, if listened to, and given authority, can set the church up to fulfill the call that God has given them. Now, don’t get me wrong, the pastor is the person who articulates the agenda for the group they are shepherding, but don’t forget that there are others who are blessed with great talent and creativity. They can be a powerful force for ministry too.

Don’t make your ministry a career – My heart breaks when I see pastors moving from church to church in a relatively short amount of time. In a way, I get it. Sometimes one church is not a great fit and we make mistakes discerning where God wants us. The problem comes, though, when a minister is always in search of that next larger church as if it is some sort of “promotion”. When we do this, we start to look at people as a consumer good or inanimate object. We also begin to look at each spiritual interaction as a means to an end for our benefit. Pastor…YOU MUST STOP THIS! The people who are in front of you are hurting and need someone to lead them into their own Promised Land. You could be their Moses (well, technically Joshua but you get my point). Don’t leave your ministry until God calls you to do so. And, no, God’s only way of “calling you” is not through the avenue of more influence, comfort, and a higher salary. Snap out of it.

It’s okay to admit you are wrong – It is often tempting, as a pastor, to believe that the people who we lead in ministry think of us as flawless human beings who can do no wrong. This is obviously false. There are times when the pastor is wrong, and if they are stubborn about admitting this quickly then their influence will be tarnished. People want leaders who are transparent and who understand their pain. If their shepherd won’t admit and embrace their humanity then they become irrelevant. We don’t have all the answers and we can’t fix every problem. We can, however love people through their own mess.

I wish I would have learned a lot of these things earlier in ministry. I think it would make me a better leader today. It’s okay, though, because God is still using me and I am anxious to continue to grow.

Love you all.

-Landon DeCrastos

Go to Sleep!

You know what question
Gets under my skin?

What part of left
Becomes right again?

Also how much sky touches the ground
Or how much upright is upside down?

How much red is found in blue?
How much desert is covered in dew?

What about laughing that turns into a frown
Or how secretly unhappy are whimsical clowns?

Does it really matter how much a hen weighs?
Or how many hours add up to days?

How loud and heavy is a plop?
How many flips are in a flop?

Why are people different than they seem?
Why don’t we ever see grape ice cream?

Who has the job of inspecting my flight?

Or

Who invented the original kite?

All of these things swirl in my head
And make me toss and turn in my bed

But…the answer to all of these
Will never change the earth

Nor will the constant worry
We have experienced from birth

So take a moment to calm your mind
And leave your concern far behind

You don’t really have to be the one
To know all the answers under the sun

Take a breath.
Go to sleep.
Your day is complete.

Even though slumber sounds like an impossible feat.

Goodnight.

-Landon DeCrastos

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Overcoming Evil

Overcoming EvilEvil is all around us. Most people agree on this subject whether they are a Christian or not. When we see a child brutally murdered or a government horribly oppressing its people, we can see darkness and it is blatantly obvious.

The Bible uses different words to describe evil. We see synonyms like “wickedness” or “malice” among many others used to convey this intention. When these words are used, scripture goes on to describe details that include a wide range of activities. Many times, in fact, we see the perpetrators seeming to have a great time and falling into very comfortable patterns when they are called out in this way.

Sometimes, it is easy to throw the word “evil” around at our own discretion. For instance, if something inconveniences us enough or someone behaves outside of our understanding of “goodness” then we may be tempted to use this significant word to describe the event.

The Word is clear that we are to stay away from evil of every kind. It also indicates that we should avoid associating with those who practice evil. Yet, in even more places in scripture, the example is given that shows us we are to come alongside the sinner and even serve them. We see healing, teaching, feeding, loving, and caring for these people who are living lives directly opposed to God’s law? So, how do we reconcile these thoughts? Do we avoid these folks, or do we love on them? Do we stop at praying for them? Or, do we get into their lives?

These are thoughts I am still tossing around in my mind, but I do know that people will not accept or follow the life-giving message of Jesus if they do not hear it in our voice and see it in our lives. Granted, we are never the ones who convert people, but we can still convey a message of hope and show that there is a way out.

Evil is born from a full embrace of sin. When we reject God and His abundance, we begin to look at the world in a way that was never intended through the process of creation. We also begin to look at ourselves as the one true authority in the universe.

Here is something interesting to ponder, though. So many times, when God comes down hard on sin in scripture, it is in response to the actions of people who claim to follow Him. Sure, people who don’t know Him are mentioned, and even rebuked, but often they are being spoken about in third person. Essentially, they are referred to as the mission and part of the purpose of believers.

So, what are we to do with the verses that tell us to avoid evil and those who promote sin? Well, in many cases these things are being said to believers who are very immature in their faith. A mature follower of Jesus has grown and prayed for the mind and heart of God. He or she has established in their own heart that their deep passion is to see that the lost are found, and the wicked are made clean. Also, their mindset changes as they begin to see these “evil” people through God’s compassionate eyes.

I can’t say that I fully grasp God’s grace and mercy, but I can make assumptions based off what I do know. Here is the way I see it. While sin and evil are synonymous, I think God’s perspective is much deeper than simply writing off transgressors.

Romans 6:23 tells us that the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life…The question, I have is “what are we doing to offer people life as an alternative to death?”

We need to stop looking at people as evil and instead start looking at them as hurting, dying, and in need of rescue.

That man who is on his third drunken binge this week…is he sinning? Yes

That single lady caught up in promiscuity…is she sinning? Yes

That person who abandoned their family…are they sinning? Yes

But…before we call them evil let’s ask ourselves if…

that man is trying to medicate the memories of a past abuse,

or

this lady has never seen a healthy relationship…

or even

if this person went through a crisis that they never worked through in a healthy way.

Leading people out of sin means investing in them. It means sometimes getting dirty. God wants us to be a living sacrifice, and while we are never called to participate in evil and sin, we are called to help mend broken hearts.

Be someone’s way out today.

Love you all

-Landon DeCrastos