Is Bivocational Ministry a Sin?

bivo ministryToday, I am going to give you a “behind the scenes” look at the life and thought process of a bivocational pastor. This category of minister is becoming more common, because we are seeing a fundamental change in the landscape of pastoral ministry. The economy is changing in a way so that many churches are not able to pay their pastor a full-time wage so they must seek employment outside of the church to support their family. It is nothing new, of course, because we know that missionaries have been doing this very thing for hundreds of years. Traditionally, we see this type of ministry done in a church with a smaller membership. The reason for this is obvious; a lack of funding. I am a bivocational pastor, and I know many of them. I don’t often hear complaints about living this lifestyle from the clergy themselves. It is necessary and most are happy to do it (albeit tired) if it means being able to give more to the church, and support their family.

Bivocational ministry can be a great blessing to the Kingdom of God. Through this method, pastors can directly interact with people in the workplace that they may not normally get to minister to. Clergy then can be immersed missionaries in all environments, and embed themselves in just about any context. These are positive aspects to this lifestyle.

Are there any negatives to living this way? Well…unfortunately there are downfalls. Pastors get tired, and as much as we can say that they need to be solely sustained by their calling, it does not negate the fact that our physical bodies and emotional capacities wear down over time. Members will sometimes become frustrated with their leader because the church may not be growing by a massive amount. Meanwhile, the minister is giving every ounce of energy they possess to two (or more) vocations and it can feel like running on a never-ending treadmill. While the pastor is at their day job, there may even be a person who needs them laying in a hospital bed, and their family is becoming frustrated because they have not yet had a visit. Often the answer is to demand more and more from the leader instead of stepping up to the plate.

Clergy that choose to live this life accept the fact that they must adapt to the needs of their position. Sometimes they drop the ball, or forget an important detail. There are times they want to say “no” because they just want one free night to themselves. At the same time, love and the desire for the broken to be healed compels them. It animates their dry bones. Changed lives ignite energy.

I have spoken with pastors who become very frustrated, because people have told them that they need to be more focused on the church and that they should quit their job and “trust God more” for finances. I would argue that this pastor should ask that wonderful parishioner to quit their job so they can volunteer at the church full-time, and see what they say. I digress. The fact is, there are many Christians who would never admit it, but by their actions, would consider bivocational ministry a sin. “Sin” of course being that which inconveniences them. What we forget is that every Christian is called to be a minister. Every believer is a missionary in their context.

Now, before I get angry emails and comments, I want to make it very clear, that I am very blessed to have a congregation that understands the costs and rewards of a pastor that is bivocational. I appreciate the fact that I can live this life with their support and encouragement.

Scripture tells us that even the Apostle Paul was a minister who worked a second job. He had an incredible passion for the Gospel. He did what God called Him to do. He looked forward and didn’t dwell in the past.

Is bivocational ministry a sin? Of course not. Let’s stop treating it that way.

Love you all.

-Landon DeCrastos

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3 Things All Pastors Should Know

3 Things All Pastors Should KnowOne of the most important lessons I have learned as a pastor is that I must always maintain a teachable spirit. Ministry can be stressful and require a lot of physical, spiritual, emotional, and mental energy so making a vow to humbly learn all one can is vital. I am, by no means, an expert in the area of ministry, but I have realized that there are things I didn’t necessarily learn in seminary.  I do believe that my schooling was very valuable and I would recommend it to any pastor I speak with, but there are just so many things that must be learned on the “field” that can’t be taught.

Today, I want to speak about 3 Things All Pastors Should Know.

Sometimes your ideas are not the best ideas– Often when a pastor enters into their ministry calling, they have big and beautiful ideas about the programs, sermons, partnerships, and impact they will have in their church or organization. These types of thoughts get them excited about the endless possibilities. Then, reality sets in and when the minister makes their attempt to change the world, discouragement comes because the people they are leading are not responding in the way they imagined. Sometimes, this makes church leaders frustrated and want to give up. The fact is, this realization does have to be a bad thing. Often times, the best thing that could happen in pastoral ministry is for the anointed leader to come to terms with the fact that they are not the most creative person in the church. Perhaps there are others that, if listened to, and given authority, can set the church up to fulfill the call that God has given them. Now, don’t get me wrong, the pastor is the person who articulates the agenda for the group they are shepherding, but don’t forget that there are others who are blessed with great talent and creativity. They can be a powerful force for ministry too.

Don’t make your ministry a career – My heart breaks when I see pastors moving from church to church in a relatively short amount of time. In a way, I get it. Sometimes one church is not a great fit and we make mistakes discerning where God wants us. The problem comes, though, when a minister is always in search of that next larger church as if it is some sort of “promotion”. When we do this, we start to look at people as a consumer good or inanimate object. We also begin to look at each spiritual interaction as a means to an end for our benefit. Pastor…YOU MUST STOP THIS! The people who are in front of you are hurting and need someone to lead them into their own Promised Land. You could be their Moses (well, technically Joshua but you get my point). Don’t leave your ministry until God calls you to do so. And, no, God’s only way of “calling you” is not through the avenue of more influence, comfort, and a higher salary. Snap out of it.

It’s okay to admit you are wrong – It is often tempting, as a pastor, to believe that the people who we lead in ministry think of us as flawless human beings who can do no wrong. This is obviously false. There are times when the pastor is wrong, and if they are stubborn about admitting this quickly then their influence will be tarnished. People want leaders who are transparent and who understand their pain. If their shepherd won’t admit and embrace their humanity then they become irrelevant. We don’t have all the answers and we can’t fix every problem. We can, however love people through their own mess.

I wish I would have learned a lot of these things earlier in ministry. I think it would make me a better leader today. It’s okay, though, because God is still using me and I am anxious to continue to grow.

Love you all.

-Landon DeCrastos

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Hello Friends!

I have been hard at work making videos and uploading them to my new YouTube Channel! I need your help to grow the channel! Subscribe to the Ministry Sauce Channel by clicking on the picture above or CLICK HERE. I will post regular videos pertaining to spiritual growth and Biblical challenges. Check out the videos and share them as well! Thank you.

2 Strange Letters

There are 2 strange letters

on your word I see

Their placement on the front

Doesn’t make sense to me

I am pretty good at reading

But these 2 don’t fit

They don’t describe what I see

It’s the meaning I don’t get

The first letter I have seen

In books and other things

The second is also familiar

But confusion is what it brings

The word is badly changed

And it doesn’t reflect the truth

It doesn’t show how I see you

Whether aged or in your youth

These 2 strange letters

Throw everything off track

They mess up your description

And set the meaning back

Without these intruders

The definition wonderfully fits

They initially seem harmless

But shatter hearts to bits

The letters are “I” and “M”

But I remind you they don’t work

The accuser uses them untruthfully

To diminish the Master’s work

The word in question is “perfect”

And in its purest form

Is how I look at you daily

Through sunshine, snow, or storm

Don’t let the enemy convince you

That you are not good enough

And that God can’t possibly love you

With all of your broken stuff

While you may be human

And lacking in many things

You are perfect; you are loved

You are a child of the King

For the Love…

For the loveMy heart broke as I sat across from an elderly woman who began to weep in front of me. I didn’t know her and she didn’t really know me. Her husband displayed little emotion directly next to her…as if he was internally numb. Both of them were sitting in front of me because of their deep love for the church that they attend.

Periodically, I am asked by an organization I am associated with, to enter churches and survey members of the congregations that are having deep division and conflict. I provide them with prompts for them to begin speaking, but really they set most of the agenda as they share what is on their heart. The experience is not only used to collect data and the “pulse” of the people who attend the church, but also serves as a cathartic experience for those who are hurting.

The elderly woman in front of me was sobbing as she spoke about what the church was going through. This church was experiencing division, backbiting, and disorganization. At first, her posture was one of anger and bitterness. She had complaints about surface level issues like music style, carpet color, and men not always wearing a tie. She thought, so many times, about leaving the congregation and seeking one with less issues. Over a period of about 15 minutes, though, her attitude changed as she explained the deep impact this local worship family has had over the span of her long life. She told stories that truly embody what the Church is supposed to look like. Her past highlights include service projects, care for unknown people in the community, laughter, and changed lives. She truly loved this church. She was just so heartbroken to see what it was going through.

At first, I silently judged her (just being honest) based on the fact that her initial complaints were rather trite by my standards. If I would have stopped there, I would have jumped to the incorrect conclusion that these type of attitudes were the things holding the church down. What I realized, is that these complaints were simply a symptom of a larger conflict. The woman in front of me had trouble processing the deep division and simply wanted to experience something that made her comfortable in the moment. I can’t really fault her for that.

As imperfect as we are as Christians, and as many times as we all get it wrong, I can’t help but think that there is something redemptive in this woman’s tears, and a lesson to be learned. As a pastor, it is so easy to look at everything with an intense, theologically driven eye, and use my time to criticize people’s underlying motivations. I can give a class on why we are failing as a Christian culture and how value the wrong things. This all, however does not take the sting out of the genuine pain that this woman was feeling.

More and more, I am coming to the conclusion that, the church does not need more charismatic leaders, insightful Bible studies, church growth tactics, or even upbeat music. We need to mourn more losses together, cry, stay determined, keep an open heart, and most importantly; we need unity.

This woman was crying because the community she loved was struggling. Whether she was a shining example of a perfect Christian or not is neither here nor there. She loved.

So, perhaps you are reading this today thinking, “this lady was putting too much faith in people instead of God”. Or, maybe you are ready to lash out at me in an attack on “institutional religion”. Well, you may be right on some accounts, but I surely won’t fault someone who has seen such transformation in people’s lives, and for better or for worse, connects those events to a body of caring, loving, serving, and mutually-accountable people who desperately want God’s will to be done (on Earth as it is in Heaven).

Love you all.

-Landon DeCrastos

Life Expectancy | Part 2

In my last post, I spoke about the concepts of death and life obstacles. People who are born into life obstacles, whether they are mental or physical, can provide a vast amount of life lessons. Even if they are not particularly mobile, we find that stories after their death provide deep insight to a life lived with vitality and purpose. As discussed in my story about my Uncle Jay, the life he led was one that made no excuses and had deep purpose. He cared about those around him and strived to minister to anyone in need.

As I write this today, we have a family friend who is probably only hours from meeting Jesus face to face. Cancer has taken over and eaten away at every fiber of her being. Last week she gave her life to the Lord and says she is ready for eternal rest. Her smile is contagious and her only concern is the supportive relationships she is leaving behind. I was honored to pray with her and those that surrounded the bed.

If you were to travel 30 minutes south, there is another man struggling to survive in a hospital room after his organs began to shut down due to an advanced infection. I was referred to him by another pastor friend, who heard about him from a couple in his church. This man does not have a pastor or church home. When you look at him, and speak about what the future may hold, there is deep fear in his eyes. I can’t imagine how that must feel because I have ever died nor been close to death.

In both cases, I have had the wonderful privilege of speaking with the individuals about spiritual matters, and what exists the beyond the spiritual horizon. As a pastor, I am there to provide a comforting word in a time of great fear and simply be present with family who are struggling to cope with a future they dare not try to imagine for fear that their thoughts will materialize into reality. They want their loved ones to be okay. In the instances that the relatives have come to terms with the inevitable, they simply want to know their loved ones are at peace, and free of suffering.

It is often interesting to hear the words and questions of a person who formerly had no association with God (as they would admit freely), and are now dealing with their own mortality. I find, in many cases, unbelief did not come because of stubbornness or a lack of evidence, but because of a deep wound inflicted on them by someone in their past who claimed belief. In the last days there is greater awareness and attention focused on divine possibilities. People seem to be finally done pretending they are in control, and are now surrendered to another universe of possible explanations. They are open and ready to hear more.

In these final moments of life, my role as a member of the clergy is not to lead them in a Bible study or help them lead a spiritually productive life…it is to be a tour guide. Men and women who are facing their own mortality want to know what it is like to experience their last breath so that they know what to expect the moment after. They want someone to describe life beyond the curtain. I get to provide insight about the promises God makes to them, and the descriptions His word supplies. From God’s perspective, death is only a change of address.

There is great comfort in knowing that a life can be changed; even in the last moments. The person may not become an active citizen, or reach hundreds of lives, but what I have realized is that they gain one of the most powerful gifts that a human can possess…

Peace.

Love you all.

-Landon DeCrastos

What Makes Me Cry (In a Good Way)

What Makes Me Cry (In a Good Way)

I know it has been a while since I have uploaded a new blog post. The reason for this is twofold:

  1. I promised myself a long time ago that I would no longer post blogs just to put content out into the universe. When I do, I find myself giving into the temptation to simply be recognized. Thus, I am taking the glory for myself and I am no good for God’s kingdom because I am saying things that no one needs to read and do not really help them deepen their spiritual life. I want my thoughts and advice to be life giving.

  1. My schedule has not permitted it. Lately, I have been very busy but yet so fulfilled in my ministry when it comes to the people I have been able to interact with and minister to. Sometimes, there just isn’t enough time in the day.

So, with this all being said, I have something that is stirring in my heart that has been emphasized over and over in recent conversations and events in my life.

First, a little background.

From time to time, when I preach, I get emotional. It is a fact of life. My church staff and leadership often give me a hard time about the fact that I cry and there are even a few occasions when my staff has purposefully planned a portion of the worship service SO I would cry (ok, so maybe that wasn’t the full reason but they certainly knew it would happen)! Other people have commented on this, and simply say they see the passion in me and they appreciate the show of emotion. Either way, it happens and I never really have been bashful about it.

There are many reasons I cry in the context of my ministry. When I dedicate a baby to the Lord, when someone asks Christ into their life, the times when people open up and reconcile with one another, when a marriage is restored, when a person needing healing is shown unconditional love and when a person in need is helped by generosity are only a few instances in which I have cried recently. I can even think of times when I have been preaching and God impresses something special on my heart to share aside from what was prepared. The feeling is overwhelming. These all have validity and the ability to conjure emotion, but I have realized there is one constant thread that connects all of these events. That thread is the concept of “legacy”.

I cry when I think about how a message will speak to someone and how the figurative “light bulb” will be illuminated in their mind, because of how it can move them along in their spiritual journey and toward a new future. I cry when I dedicate a baby to the Lord, because of the parents standing in front of me wanting to break a generational curse of bondage or even wanting to honor the heritage of worship in their own household by trusting God with the future of this baby. When a marriage makes a turnaround, I think about the story the couple can tell of how they trusted God to repair their shattered relationship. When people are helped through a tough spot in their life, I think about how they can later share their struggles and how God got them through it.

Legacy.

It is a powerful word that has the ability to affect us and future generations. I am not only speaking about genetic descendants. In fact, many people reading this today can testify about a friend or neighbor that spoke life displayed love in a dark time and changed their future trajectory.

I cry when I think about how God can change a situation and create a “butterfly effect” that can transform the world.

I cry because I know that no matter how talented and influential we are, Jesus can use us as agents of peace and grace.

Finally, I cry because I know that my redeemer lives, and in the end, He will stand on the Earth (Job 19:25).

It’s okay to cry.

Love you all.

-Landon DeCrastos